For Pre-intermediate level up to Intermediate level

For Pre-intermediate level up to Intermediate level
Learning new words and sentences - Part One

Practical exercise for pre-intermediate and intermediate level

Posted 3 months ago by Odentall

For pre-intermediate level up to intermediate level

Learning new words and sentences - Part One

 

Easy Learning English Series 

Article: A Basic Education Course for adult learners

Written by ShaPour KhodaParast

ShaPour KhodaParast presents you How We Can Easily Talk in English.

 

This course of study is designed for adult learners with basic knowledge of English.

This series of the basic course is useful for learning and speaking English as a foreign language.
 

πŸ“– Let's get started!

πŸ“–  Basic words and sentences by using the text of a weblog

πŸ“– Learning new words and sentences - Part One

 

πŸ“– For pre-intermediate level up to intermediate level

a little    /    a bit    /    a little bit    /    a little bit of

 

  • I felt sad.  β‡’  I felt a little sad.  β‡’  I felt a little bit sad.
  • I felt a little bit sad.  β‡’  I’ve felt a little bit sad.

 

  • I felt cold.  β‡’  I felt a little cold.  β‡’  I felt a little bit cold.
  • I felt a little bit cold.  β‡’  I've felt a little bit cold.

 

  • I felt anxious.  β‡’  I felt a little anxious.  β‡’  I felt a little bit anxious.
  • I felt a little bit anxious.  β‡’  I've felt a little bit anxious.

 

  • I felt angry.  β‡’  I felt a little angry.  β‡’  I felt a little bit angry.
  • I felt a little bit angry.  β‡’  I've felt a little bit angry.

 

  • I felt dizzy.  β‡’  I felt a little dizzy.  β‡’  I felt a little bit dizzy.
  • I felt a little bit dizzy.  β‡’  I've felt a little bit dizzy.

 

  • I felt crazy.  β‡’  I felt a little crazy.  β‡’  I felt a little bit crazy.
  • I felt a little bit crazy.  β‡’  I've felt a little bit crazy.

 

  • I felt of confusion.  β‡’  I felt a little of confusion.  β‡’  I felt a little bit of confusion.    πŸ“˜πŸ“š
  • I felt a little bit of confusion.  β‡’  I've felt a little bit of confusion.    πŸ“˜πŸ“š

 

πŸ“– Confusion is a noun so you can find this word in the dictionaries this way, Confusion (n), and "n" is a short form for a noun and tell you that this word is a noun and when we want to use it with " a little" or " a little bit" we have to add up "of" before the noun then we would have " a little of + n" or " a little bit of + n".

 

πŸ“– How about the other above words we have!?  sad, cold, anxious, angry, dizzy, crazy 

πŸ“˜πŸ“š sad, cold, anxious, angry, dizzy, crazy all these words are adjective and if you use an online dictionary and to write one of the above words you would notice it has been written this way Sad (adj), and "adj" is the short form of the adjective and show us that we can use this word as an adjective in a sentence. 

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“š All these words are { sad(adj), cold(adj), anxious(adj), angry(adj), dizzy(adj), crazy(adj) } adjective.

πŸ“˜πŸ“š It's a good time to review some simple definitions that there is in every language, and it's about noun and adjectives.

  • what's a noun? and what's an adjective too?

The definition of a noun is so simple. You may even remember your elementary school teachers telling you that a noun is a person, place or thing. So, the answer to the above question, What is a Noun? we can say, a noun is a word (except a pronoun) that identifies a person, place or thing, or names one of them (proper noun).

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“šThe simple definition is a person, place or thing. Here are some examples:

  • Person: man, woman, teacher, John, Mary, tutor, instructor, Doctor, Engineer
  • Place: home, office, town, countryside, America, museum, mosque, school, university, college
  • Thing: table, car, banana, money, music, love, dog, monkey, pen, pencil, nip, eraser, marker

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“š The problem with the simple definition above is that it does not explain why "love" is a noun but can also be a verb. We can often recognize a noun by its position in the sentence. Nouns often come after a determiner (a determiner is a word like a, an, the, this, my, such, a pair of, a few):  β‡’  a relief - an afternoon - the doctor - this word - my house - such stupidity 

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“š Nouns often come after one or more adjectives: β‡’  a great relief - a peaceful afternoon - the tall, Indian doctor - this difficult word - my black and white house - such crass stupidity.

 

πŸ“– Let's go one step forward - Let's go one step further    β‡’  Both are the same, there is no difference in between.

πŸ“˜πŸ“š The simplest definition of a noun is a thing and nouns are the basic building blocks of sentences. These things can represent a person, animal, place, idea, emotion – almost anything that you can think of. 

Dog, Sam, love, phone, Chicago, courage, and spaceship are all nouns.

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“šThe more nouns you know in a language, the better you will be able to communicate your ideas.

  • Noun examples in the following sentences are in bold for easy identification.
  •  
  • The boy and girl were holding hands as they crossed the bridge on the way to town.
  • I love watching my cat play with the pink yarn.
  • It is raining! Everyone, grab your umbrella and rain hat and watch out for the puddles!

 

πŸ“– Let's have a look at adjectives.  β‡’  Let's have shot a look at adjectives.

πŸ“˜πŸ“š what's an adjective too? Simply put, an adjective is a word you use to describe a person, place, or thing. An adjective modifies nouns or pronouns. Without adjectives, we couldn't describe a noun. It gives additional information about what the noun or the pronoun refers to. It usually comes right before the noun or the pronoun that it modifies. 

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“š So, Let's dive into the adjectives.

  • poor man - old woman - gorgeous lady - lovely friend - honest guy - honest person - honest man
  • fat man - smart lady - beautiful view - thick rope - bright day - early morning - the bad guy
  • a good teacher - a young man - a talkative person - a nice idea - a good idea - main idea
  • a big house - a small ball - a close friend - an interesting story - an indoor swimming pool
  • a clever boy  - free time - elder sister - social worker
  • a wisdom person - empire Rome - nonsense words

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“š We've learned before adjectives are words that are used to describe or modify nouns or pronouns.  For example, red, quick, happy, and obnoxious are adjectives because they can describe things.

  • a red hat, the quick rabbit, a happy duck, an obnoxious person.

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“š We can use more than one adjective to describe a noun or a pronoun and when a noun comes before another noun, it becomes its adjective. 

  •  
  • wisdom person - empire Rome - nonsense words - a glass door - a leather jacket - a picture frame
  • A beautiful picture frame - a heavy glass door - an expensive leather jacket
  •  
  •  
  • A dirty old jacket - long straight black hair - an expensive leather jacket - A beautiful sunny day
  • A nice easy test - A wonderful new face cream - beautiful wooden souvenirs
  • A horrible ugly building - a beautiful quiet green holiday resort 
  • A knowledgeable retired American university professor  
  •  
  •  
  • A beautiful sunny day - A beautiful cloudy day - A beautiful rainy day - A beautiful foggy day
  • A beautiful clear day - A beautiful bright day - A beautiful clear summer day 
  • A beautiful moonlight - A moonlight night -  A summer day 
  • A beautiful summer day - A beautiful summer night - A beautiful clear summer day
  •  
  •  
  • A summer day   β‡’ Summer(n)(adj)
  • A moonlight night  β‡’ moonlight(n) - night(n)
  • A summer moonlight night  β‡’ Summer(n)(adj) - moonlight(n) - night(n)
  • A beautiful summer moonlight night  β‡’ Beautiful(adj) - summer(n)(adj) - moonlight(n) - night(n)
  • A beautiful summer night  β‡’ Beautiful(adj) - summer(n)(adj) - night(n)
  •  

 

πŸ“˜πŸ“š Here are some examples of adjectives in action, in this list the bold words in blue color are adjectives.

  • It's a big table. (size)
  • It's a round table. (shape)
  • It's an old table. (age)
  • It's a brown table. (color)
  • It's an English table. (origin)
  • It's a wooden table. (material)
  • It's a lovely table. (opinion)
  • It's a broken table. (observation)
  • It's a coffee table. (purpose)
  • Which dog did you see? It was the grey dog.
  • What kind of tomatoes did you buy? I bought red tomatoes.
  • What kind of potatoes did you buy? I bought new potatoes.
  • How many cars were in the parking lot? There were few cars. 
  • What kind of coffee do you like? I like black coffee.
  • How many people like ice cream? Most people like ice cream.
  • Which spoon did you use to stir the soup? I used a wooden spoon.
  • They live in a beautiful house.
  • Lisa is wearing a sleeveless shirt today.
  • She wore a beautiful dress.
  • He writes meaningless letters.
  • Ben is an adorable baby.
  • Linda’s hair is gorgeous.
  • This glass is breakable.
  • I met a homeless person in NY.
  • The colorful balloon floated over the treetop.
  • The big dog chased the car.
  • A yellow butterfly is sitting on the red rose.
  • The tall giraffe is eating green leaves.
  • A small rat is beside the brown cabinet.
  • The beautiful princess is wearing a purple gown.
  • I have no free time.

      

πŸ“– to be continue...

 

Good Luck.

ShaPour KhodaParast

Easy Learning English E.L.E

Myelesociety@Gmail.com

Sh_KhodaParast@Myele.Org

Comments

Sara khani 2 months ago

Hi, Mr khodaparast .Thanks for all you did for teaching us . I wanted to know why you wrote :(The definition of the noun ** used to be ...** ) because I thought we use (the expression of "used to ") when something was or behaved in a special method just in the past and today it's not
on the same method or shapes any more.

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